The  Hustler  6BTV  HF  Vertical  Antenna  -  A  Review

The  first  of  my  Hustler  6BTV  HF  Vertical  antennas  was  purchased  over  40  years  ago.  At  present  I

am  using  two  of  these  vertical  antennas  which  cover  the  80, 40, 30, 20, 15 and 10  metre  amateur  bands.

 

 

As  can  be  seen,  this  Hustler  vertical  is  ground  mounted.  The  SWR  is  very  low  on  all  bands  except  80mx.

 

This  6BTV  is  mounted  on  a  20  foot  steel  pole  with  10  radials  around  the  base

of  the  antenna  which  also  act  as  guy  wires.  The  vertical  itself  is  over  20  feet  in  length  and  also  needs  to  be  guyed.

 

 

The  following  two  pictures  show  the  vertical  before  dacron  ropes  were  used  to  support  it.

 

 

 

 

When  we  erected  the  antenna  several  years  ago,  we  used  long  metal  poles  to  push  it  into  the  vertical  position  while  a

third  person  took  up  the  slack  of  the  radials  in  front  of  us.  Other  radials  (which  also  act  as  guy  wires),  were  tied  off  to

trees  behind  us  so  that  the  antenna  did  not  keep  falling  over.  This  antenna  is  still  in  the  air  after  8  years  of  use.  (Jan.  2017)

 

 

 

 

After  erecting  the  antenna,  I  soon  realized  that  the  vertical  needed  guying  too.  The  antenna  was  taken  down  again

and  four  dacron  ropes  were  attached  at  2  points  along  the  length  of  the  vertical  to  prevent  excessive  bending. 

 

The  antenna  was  erected  once  again  -  this  time  with  dacron  ropes  supporting  the  6BTV  vertical.

This  works  very  well  and  the  antenna  has  been  in  the  air  for  nearly  8  years  now.  Unless  ground  mounted,  I  highly

recommend  that  you  do  something  similar.  Dacron  rope  can  be  purchased  from  DX Engineering.  Due  to  the  rigorous  guying

of  this  antenna,  a  devastating  mini  cyclone  which  roared  through  this  area  in  Nov.  2012  had  little  effect  on  the  ground  plane.

 

When  installing  the  dacron  ropes,  it  pays  to  use  nonslip  knots.  Also,  you  need  to  melt  the  ends  with  a  flame

to  prevent  fraying.

 

To  reduce  RFI  coming  down  the  outside  of  the  coaxial  cable  and  into  the  shack,  I  used  an  RF  choke  which

consists  of  10  turns  of  the  coax  feedline  close  wound  on  a  5  inch  PVC  former.  This  choke  also  reduces  the  received

background  noise  level.  It  then  becomes  a  very  'quiet'  antenna  but  in  most  cases,  I  think  that  it  is  unnecessary.

 

Construction  of  the  6BTV  is  straight  forward  and  it's  fairly  easy  to  erect.  One  person  can  raise  the  completed  antenna

well  enough  to  mount  the  vertical  on  a  stake  in  the  ground  but  help  will  be  needed  to  raise  it  if  mounted  on  a  long  pole.

 

The  traps  consist  of  resonant  coils  of  aluminium  wire  enclosed  in  aluminium  weather  shields  as  shown.  TVI  can  be  a  problem  with  this

type  of  antenna.  Verticals  and  ground  planes  are  known  for  their  low  angle  radiation  which  means  they  work  well  as  DX  antennas.

 

The  Hustler  6BTV  ground  plane  antenna  here  works  well  and  I  am  very  happy  with  it.

There  are  a  variety  of  vertical  antennas  on  the  market  nowadays  and  no  doubt  some  have  better  characteristics  than  this  antenna.

Even  so,  I  think  the  Hustler  vertical  with  its  ease  of  construction  and  installation  would  suit  many  people  who  are  looking  for  a  cost

effective  way  to  achieve  omni  directional  and  multiband  operation. Information  about  these  antennas  can  be  found  at  DX Engineering.

For  wallpaper  images  of  the  6BTV  here  -  click here.

 

 

 

 VK5SW - Home Page

 

 
Rate this site
The DXZone.com

(with 10 = top)

 

 

 

 

Back to the Top